New Research Perspectives on Native American Students in Higher Education

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Stephanie J. Waterman

Abstract

This chapter begins with a brief history of higher education’s role in assimilation, oppression, and removal of Indigenous people. A short literature review outlines the progression of higher education literature from deficit focused ideologies to current research that decolonizes and centers of Indigenous Knowledge Systems. “Sharing circles” as an Indigenous methodology is described. Centering Indigenous experiences in higher education and Indigenous knowledge systems focus on ways that Western forms of education can be used as tools to strengthen Native nations.

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References

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